October 21, 2014

stardustandstrawberries:

americachavez:

marvel give me a short about sharon’s undercover time as a nurse/steve’s neighbor and that one time she had to fight off ninjas from steve’s apartment while he was like, making dinner and sitting alone reading obama’s biography

With the music turned up really loudly because he’s a gentleman and he thought the noises were her having sex.

(via stuffimgoingtohellfor)

October 21, 2014

jaclcfrost:

"i’m not bitter" i say, bitterly, with a bitter expression

(via kami1)

October 21, 2014
invitinghome:

tea time

invitinghome:

tea time

(via kami1)

October 20, 2014

captainamerica-in-middle-earth:

littlewolfoffenris:

Making of my fem!Winter Soldier Cosplay

A story of fails, wins and a lot of coffee…

Holy fucking shit I can’t tell if I want to be you or be with you

(via bootsnblossoms)

October 20, 2014
kryptaria00q:

drgrlfriend:

drgrlfriend:

earlgreyfox:

00Q by Hatt

I know I’ve reblogged this before.  I care not.

Found it!

Adorable!
(And Q is SO going to kill Bond when they land. Seriously, the trouble Bond causes…)

kryptaria00q:

drgrlfriend:

drgrlfriend:

earlgreyfox:

00Q by Hatt

I know I’ve reblogged this before.  I care not.

Found it!

Adorable!

(And Q is SO going to kill Bond when they land. Seriously, the trouble Bond causes…)

October 20, 2014
"It’s a monumental overask to expect women to be gentle with the egos of men who only feigned friendship in order to get laid."

No One is Entitled to Sex: Why We Should Mock the Nice Guys of OkCupid  (via solar—gambling)

(Source: peachersen, via emmagrant01)

October 20, 2014

robindudley:

Elizabeth + Robert: The missing paintings by Federico Zuccaro

In early 1575 Robert Dudley invited to England the Italian Mannerist painter, Federico Zuccaro. These paintings were intended to be displayed at the great festival at Kenilworth Castle in July 1575. Zuccaro arrived in England in March 1575 and got to work. In 1584 his contemporary, Raffaello Borghini, noted that Zuccaro had indeed painted life-sized, full-length portraits of both the queen and “Milord Lostre”. Today only two preparatory sketches in black and red chalk survive in the British Museum.

The sketch of Elizabeth has been described by Sir Roy Strong as probably her closest likeness. When first sitting for a portrait by Nicholas Hilliard, in 1572, Elizabeth had expressed her appreciation of Italian artists, “who had the name to be cunningest and to draw best”, as she thought. 

A full-length oil painting of Leicester that was clearly based on the Zuccaro sketch survived until the Second World War. Other than the lost portrait, which may have been a copy, Zuccaro’s sketch is of exceptional quality and surely gives a perfect impression of Robert Dudley’s presence and his irresistible charm. (x)

(via hjaxon1701)

October 20, 2014
fashionsfromhistory:


The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen
1904, printed 1909 

Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.


Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.


(MET)

fashionsfromhistory:

The Flatiron by Edward J. Steichen

1904, printed 1909 

Steichen added color to the platinum print that forms the foundation of this photograph by using layers of pigment suspended in a light-sensitive solution of gum arabic and potassium bichromate. Together with two variant prints in other colors, also in the Museum’s collection, “The Flatiron” is the quintessential chromatic study of twilight. Clearly indebted in its composition to the Japanese woodcuts that were in vogue at the turn of the century and in its coloristic effect to the “Nocturnes” of Whistler, this picture is a prime example of the conscious effort of photographers in the circle of Alfred Stieglitz to assert the artistic potential of their medium.
Steichen and Stieglitz selected this photograph for inclusion in the “International Exhibition of Pictorial Photography” held at the Albright Art Gallery (now the Albright-Knox Art Gallery) in Buffalo, New York, in 1910. The exhibition of six hundred photographs represented the capstone of Stieglitz’s efforts to promote Pictorialist photography as a fine art.
(MET)

October 20, 2014

sometimes-im-a-ballerina:

elisabetta formento and ekaterina zavadina in Bach

(via adultbeginnerballerina)

October 20, 2014

casualblessings:

May you find relief from the bad memories of your past that make you feel unworthy

(via pizzaqueerest)

October 20, 2014

fallohmeintothedark:

if u wanna date me I hope u like excessive swearing and long talks about feminism

(via camiquintana)

October 20, 2014

thechamberofsecrets:

earlier today i was thinking about the thousands of girls who post videos on youtube reviewing makeup and talking about their fav products and making tutorials and how no girl has ever once done it just to impress men like literally that whole community exists just for girls because it’s something that so many of us enjoy and yet men still think that we wear makeup for them

(via camiquintana)

October 19, 2014
pagewoman:

source
The Yorkshire Dales,England.

pagewoman:

source

The Yorkshire Dales,England.

(via kami1)

October 19, 2014
desbricoles:

Eifman Ballet, Nina Zmievets in Boris Eifman’s “Anna Karenina” | Photo: Mark Olich

desbricoles:

Eifman Ballet, Nina Zmievets in Boris Eifman’s “Anna Karenina” | Photo: Mark Olich

(Source: thespoopyballet, via kuklarusskaya)

October 19, 2014

(Source: dancersaretheathletesofgod)